MIT Unit Affiliation:
Lab Affiliation(s):
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA
Post Doc Sponsor / Advisor:
MJ Demkowicz, S Gradecak, CA Schuh
Date PhD Completed:
September, 2012
Expected End Date of Post Doctoral Position:
January 10, 2015

Matteo Seita

  • Post Doctoral

MIT Unit Affiliation: 

  • Materials Science and Engineering

Lab Affiliation(s): 

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA

Post Doc Sponsor / Advisor: 

MJ Demkowicz, S Gradecak, CA Schuh

Date PhD Completed: 

Sep, 2012

Expected End Date of Post Doctoral Position: 

January 10, 2015

CV: 

Thesis Title: 

Full Microstructure Control Through Ion-Induced Grain Growth, Texturing and Constrained Deformation in Thin Metal Films

Thesis Abstract: 

The focus of my PhD thesis is the study of the manifold effects arising from the ion beam irradiation of thin metal films. The main topics which are discussed here regard ion induced grain growth and texturing, the integration of ion-modified metal films in microelectronic industry and the ion induced deformation mechanisms in metal films.

Ion induced grain growth and texturing represents the branch of research aimed to gain full control on the microstructure of vapor deposited thin films in order to optimize their physical and chemical properties for the desired application and to increase their reliability. This research is motivated by the progressive miniaturization of the microelectronic devices which in many cases leads the materials to operate at conditions in which they approach their physical capabilities. 

The integration of ion-modified metal films in microelectronic industry, however, can only be implemented when the employed technologies such as ion irradiation, film deposition and post processing of the films are compatible with the standard microfabrication technology. For this reason, the proposed method for the production of biaxially textured films presents an approach to microstructure transformation at low energy/low damage regimes, which “adapts” ion-modified metal films for microelectronic industry. 

The study of the ion induced deformation mechanisms in metal films presented in this thesis is driven by a more fundamental motivation which stems from the intrinsic essence of human beings: curiosity. Few previous works already described the phenomenon of ion bombardment induced texture rotation in self-ion irradiated gold films, but so far no concrete theory could be formulated that explained the peculiar crystal rotation upon ion bombardment. By merging the knowledge gained from the experimental data to the evidence supported by the finite element modeling of the ion/target interaction, we propose a theory which explains the dynamics of ion bombardment induced texture rotation with remarkable precision, to an extent that does not leave many open questions or free interpretations on what are the mechanisms which drive such a deformation phenomenon. 

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