Lab Affiliation(s):
Crystal Physics and Electroceramics Laboratory
Post Doc Sponsor / Advisor:
Prof. Harry Tuller and Prof. Bilge Yildiz
Areas of Expertise:
  • Electrochemistry
  • Solid State Ionics
  • Materials Characterization
Date PhD Completed:
June, 2013
Expected End Date of Post Doctoral Position:
September 1, 2015

Kiran Adepalli

  • Post Doctoral

MIT Unit Affiliation: 

  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Nuclear Science and Engineering

Lab Affiliation(s): 

Crystal Physics and Electroceramics Laboratory

Post Doc Sponsor / Advisor: 

Prof. Harry Tuller and Prof. Bilge Yildiz

Date PhD Completed: 

Jun, 2013

Top 3 Areas of Expertise: 

Electrochemistry
Solid State Ionics
Materials Characterization

Expected End Date of Post Doctoral Position: 

September 1, 2015

CV: 

Research Projects: 

  • 2012-2014 (at MIT): Ionic and electronic transport under mechanical and electrical effects in materials for energy conversion (fuel cells) and information storage (memristors).
  • 2009-2012 (PhD): Influence of extended defects on the electrical properties of TiO2
  • 2006-2009 (Masters): Study on interdiffusion and growth of Nb3Sn superconductor with A15 structure and other interconnects for electronic packaging.
  • 2002-2006 (Bachelors): Determination of kinetic parameters of precipitation and dissolution reactions in a 7017 Al -Zn-Mg alloy from Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC) studies

Thesis Title: 

Influence of extended defects on the electrical properties of TiO2

Thesis Abstract: 

TiO2 is a promising material for many technological applications such as solar cells, water splitting,
memory devices and Li-ion batteries. Point defect chemistry is a common thread for all these diverse
applications, and their variation influence the functionality of the device. Hence doping and
microstructure engineering became the major adjusting screw for several years. Apart from these,
another potential way to tune the transport properties is by creation of extended defects like dislocations,
which take an intermediate place thermodynamically and kinetically between interfaces and point defects.
This thesis work mainly focused on this aspect of creating one-dimensional dislocations and two
dimensional interfaces to study their influence on the local point defect transport. It is observed that
dislocations potentially alter the regular defect chemistry; which resulted in unexpected yet exciting
properties – reasoned in the framework of space charge models. Electrical chemical characterization of
the samples along with TEM and oxygen tracer experiments with SIMS analysis provided an in depth
understanding of majority charge carriers.

Top 5 Awards and honors (name of award, date received): 

International Max Planck Research School Fellowship (2009-2012)
Contact Information:
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